Framewright/Codex On-Set Color Solution Used on “Hope Springs”

Posted by on Aug 6, 2012

As more and more film and television productions move to digital acquisition, directors and cinematographers have increasingly sought simple means to “pre-visualize” color on the set in order to have better control over the look of their footage from dailies through post production.

Many filmmakers have found that predefined 3D look-up tables (LUTs) are inadequate for projects shot with digital cameras, especially when recording in raw modes. While these preset LUTs are of some value for previewing intended looks, their lack of flexibility and the color information they provide can be limiting, or lost during post production as it is often not retained as part of the original camera media.

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Mike Leigh’s Olympics Film “A Running Jump” Captured on Codex

Posted by on Jul 30, 2012

London, UK –Codex Digital, the leading developer of digital media recorders and media management systems for film and television production, today announces that Codex Onboard Recorders were used with ARRI Alexa cameras on Mike Leigh’s short film A Running Jump.

A Running Jump was one of four short films commissioned by BBC Films and Film4 for the London 2012 Festival. All four films premiered at the Edinburgh International Film Festival on June 24th and will be screened on the BBC and Channel 4 during the London 2012 Festival. Funding came from the National Lottery through the Olympic Lottery Distributor and Creative Scotland.

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“Bayonet” Captured on Codex

Posted by on Jul 9, 2012

Independent short uses Codex Onboard recorder to create “studio quality” look.

LOS ANGELES—Bayonet, a short political thriller from Bergen Films and Director Gregory Horoupian, recently completed principal photography using digital recording technology from Codex. The short was shot by cinematographer Lyle Vincent using an ARRI Alexa Studio camera paired with anamorphic lenses and a Codex Onboard M recorder.

According to Horoupian, whose previous credits include A Perfect Execution and Solitude, Bayonet was inspired by the classic political dramas of the 1970s, and he noted that he, Vincent and DIT Matthew Martin conducted extensive camera tests during preproduction to find a modern version of the deep, rich widescreen look of those films. “Ultimately, only the combination of the Alexa Studio camera and anamorphic lenses was able to create the images we were striving for,” he explains.

The Codex Onboard M recorder provided Horoupian with practical means to maximize image quality by facilitating the capture of the uncompressed RAW output from the Alexa Studio’s 4:3 sensor.  “No other recorder would have allowed us to capture the amount of data generated by the camera,” he said. “It was essential to our look.”

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Cinegear 2012: Codex to Showcase Recording and Workflow Solutions

Posted by on May 29, 2012

Codex Delivers 4K Workflow for Canon Cinema EOS Digital Cameras

Los Angeles –Cinegear Booth 48A – Codex Digital will showcase its latest digital media recorders and media management systems for film and television production at Cinegear 2012 in Los Angeles. Featured products will include the Codex Vault S, Codex’s next generation, modular, location-based media management environment, which has begun shipping.

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Codex Powers ARRIRAW Workflow for “Riddick”

Posted by on May 8, 2012

Montreal’s Michel Trudel introduces Codex Onboard recorders and Transfer Station to Eastern Canada.

LONDON—Michel Trudel Inc., operators of Canada’s largest production studio, supplied Codex recording and workflow technologies to the long anticipated sequel to Pitch Black and The Chronicles of Riddick, tentatively titled Riddick . Codex Onboard recorders were used to capture ARRIRAW data from two ARRI Alexa cameras. A Codex Transfer Station was used for on-set dailies processing, back-up and deliverables production.

As with the franchise’s first film Pitch Black, Riddick united director David Twohy and cinematographer David Eggby, ACS. Principal photography was completed on four stages with full sets. The sets described alien landscapes that filled the entire floor space and allowed Eggby and his crew to shoot 360-degrees. One stage alone was rigged with more than 500 feet of green screen material.

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